Archive for the Horror Festivals Category

Rabid (2019) Review

Posted in Horror Blog, Horror Festivals, Women in Horror Recognition Month with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 13, 2019 by Hayley's Horror Reviews

**Warning: Contains Some Spoilers**

Laura Vandervoort (Smallville) stars as Rose, an underappreciated fashion designer who becomes the victim of a dreadful accident in the Soska Sisters (American Mary-2012) inventive reimagining of David Cronenberg’s cult classic, Rabid (1977). After becoming horrifically scarred and finding her career hanging from a thread, Rose decides to seek the assistance of a private surgeon, Dr. William Burroughs (Ted Atherton) and undergoes radical stem cell surgery. Despite him restoring her outer image back to normal with Rose gaining new-found confidence, this is where her nightmare truly begins…

rabid

While unfamiliar with Cronenberg’s original, Rabid (2019) feels unique to the Soska’s flair for stylish visuals, sharp dialogue, their ability to write strong female characters and their love for the horror genre. Nothing is held back as the film presents outstanding grizzly FX, not for the faint of heart. When Rose’s facial trauma is initially revealed it’s gasp-worthily gruesome anchored by Vandervoort’s tremendous performance as the poor, unassuming woman who has experienced an unjustified misfortune. Vandervoort effortlessly allows us to connect and empathize with Rose, showcasing her vulnerability even prior to her life-altering accident as she encounters peer pressure from those around her from her ruthless boss, Gunter (Mackenzie Gray) to her well-meaning but flawed best friend, Chelsea (Hanneke Talbot).

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The gore is ramped up as the film unfolds offering up imaginatively grotesque set-pieces which will instantaneously satisfy horror lovers with a penchant for all things blood and guts. Along with this the film features mezmerizing and surreal imagery and a versatile soundtrack that adds to the overall edgy tone that the film projects. At its core, there is strong and layered storytelling developing throughout as Rose navigates the changes she has undergone while re-adapting to her environment and the toxic people around her.

The Soska Sisters boldly confront damaging attitudes towards women and body image head-on. With themes of body horror, this is the ideal platform to explore issues that plague women within the entertainment industry through a genre lens. By setting Rabid with the fashion world as a backdrop, it allows an opportunity to highlight harmful viewpoints on weight and food which effectively transcends into a horror context. For example, in the beginning, Rose is seen tucking into a bland salad but as the film progresses she finds herself with a lust for blood, depicting the notion of food discipline resulting in her gauging and metaphorically relapsing.

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Rabid incorporates several layers to it, its body horror fused with tropes from the zombie sub-genre, with an ever-advancing virus outbreak, a snowball effect resulting from Rose’s surgery. Rabid plays on the classic trope where one incident can spark off a deadly chain of events concluding in sheer mayhem and bloodshed. At the same time, it is an engaging character-driven story allowing the audience to truly care about what’s happening to the protagonist, as the plot is carefully built-up in stages, taking its time to develop rather than going straight for the jugular. The ending is absolutely startling and will remain with the audience long after the credits roll.

 

Rabid is another genre cinematic accomplishment for the Soska’s. They have incorporated a few subtle nods to American Mary which simply callsback to their most iconic film without coming across as overblown or shoehorned in.  There are some brilliant cameos which will delight fans, including Tristan Risk, Lynn Lowry, Stephen McHattie and the Twisted Twins themselves. All thats left now is to eagerly anticipate the next project from these two, innovative directors who know how to deliver dynamic and captivating horror.

The film premiered at Frightfest back in August 2019 but you can now take a bite out of Rabid as its available on  Blu-Ray courtesy of 101 Films.

Hayley Alice Roberts

Hayley’s Horror Reviews

Twitter: WelshDemoness 

 

Horror Blog Update

Posted in Horror Blog, Horror Festivals, Love Horror, Women in Horror Recognition Month with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 11, 2018 by Hayley's Horror Reviews

Hey Horror Hounds, it’s been a long time since I have posted on my main reviewing blog; so just to update you, I’m going to post the relevant links to all my latest pieces of work.

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Image Credit: Fan Octo

On Love Horror; my current mainstay for reviews, I have covered giallo mania and more with the Abertoir Horror Festival 2017, explored female status in the genre for Women in Horror Month 2018, interviewed Dave Jackson (Dir. Cat Sick Blues) of Phantasmes Video on his latest project, Gacha, Gacha and most recently reviewed the gore-drenched, killer clown slasher, Terrifier. All my recent written work is available via this link: http://lovehorror.co.uk/author/welsh-demoness/

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I’m also building a small Youtube Channel featuring all kinds of #horror content from festival/convention vlogs to reviews of cult genre movies. You can see all of that through this link,  https://www.youtube.com/user/mshayleyr1989Be sure to subscribe.

Youtube Screenshot

 

Back in November 2017, I made my acting debut in a spooky short film, directed by Independent Welsh filmmaker, Tom Hughes, entitled, Widower, the movie can be viewed here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lIPi-dWTNgE

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Image Credit: Tom Hughes

You can also find regular updates on:

https://en-gb.facebook.com/HayleysHorrorReviews/

https://www.instagram.com/welshdemoness/

As always, thank you for all your support.

Stay Scary.

Hayley Alice Roberts

Hayley’s Horror Reviews. 

Hayley’s Top 5 Feature Films of Celluloid Screams 2017

Posted in Horror Blog, Horror Festivals, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 6, 2017 by Hayley's Horror Reviews

Celluloid Screams 2017 presented festival attendees with one of their strongest line-ups to date. With classic anniversary screenings of Suspiria (1977) and Hellreaiser (1987) and an Inside No. 9 showcase with both its creators, Steve Pemberton and Reece Shearsmith present, the ninth edition of the festival proved fantastic. As well as familiar films for fans to rediscover on the big screen, Celluloid Screams also programmed a diverse selection of feature films from all over the world. The common thread between them all was that most of them contained a tongue-in-cheek flair to them, allowing the audience to experience laughs and scares and an equal amount of tension.

celluloid screams 2017

This list has sure been a tough one to compile as each film managed to bring its own identity to the table however these were the movies that struck a chord with me. So, without further ado, here are my top five feature films of Celluloid Screams 2017.

5. The Endless (2017)

  • Directed by Aaron Moorhead and Justin Benson
  • USA

the endless

Celluloid Screams 2017 launched on a high note, which therefore set the tone for the remainder of the festival. Aaron Moorhead and Justin Benson are staples of Celluloid having screened both their previous feature films, Resolution in 2012 and Spring in 2014, respectively. They have hit a hat-trick with their latest flick, The Endless. Moorhead and Benson not only write and direct but this time around they both star in the film. Their unique flair for filmmaking is present yet again as they stray away from convention bringing something surreal and intriguing to the table. In The Endless, Aaron and Justin play two brothers who happen to be former cult members. After ten years and undergoing deprogramming, the two are invited to revisit their old way of life when a mysterious videotape arrives on their doorstep. What follows is a mind-bending journey of intrigue that leads the viewer into unknown territory. Established fans will already know to expect the unexpected with their instantaneously captivating style of storytelling. The film looks beautiful which is aided by the picturesque cinematography, the open outdoors setting signifies the vastness of how the plot is essentially bigger than what is initially thought. Moorhead and Benson continue to grow within their craft, creating films that are not pigeonholed to one specific genre. The Endless is a mesmerizing film experience that is best going into without knowing too much. It will be exciting to see what these multi-talented filmmakers come up with next.

4. Creep 2 (2017)

  • Directed by Patrick Brice
  • USA

creep 2

Creep 2 is the highly anticipated sequel from director Patrick Brice. Mark Duplass makes a delicious return to his role as the batshit insane, serial killer that he made popular in the first one. This time around, he lures ambitious journalist, Sara (Desiree Akhavan) into his lair (home!). Disillusioned with his life as he approaches 40, he puts out an online ad for a videographer which draws in the disenfranchised young woman who is struggling to make a success of her obscure web series. Following an initial meeting with Aaron, the bizarre encounter provides her with enough scope for her next video. Feeling galvanized by the experience, will Sara bite off more than she can chew or will she hold her own against the unpredictable psychopath? Creep 2 is equally as superb as its predecessor, but manages to venture into even darker territory. It is nerve shredding from the outset while containing an unnerving sense of humour. Erratic and unpredictable just like its core antagonist; Creep 2 is a nail-biting, unique cinematic experience that works excellently among a festival audience. It is gasp-inducing madness and proves to be one of the most effective found footage entries within the genre right now. Between them, Brice and Duplass have created an exhilarating sequel which remains consistent to the original while challenging audience expectations which is highly ingenious to see.

3. M.F.A (2017)

  • Directed By Natalia Leite
  • USA

MFA

M.F.A is certainly a revelation in light of the recent Hollywood sexual assault scandal. This film is both timely and imperative as it fearlessly tackles a subject that still faces a taboo outlook surrounding it. Introverted art student, Noelle begins to embrace college life when she is invited to a party by a pretentious yet charming classmate named Luke. The party takes a harrowing turn when Luke shockingly rapes Noelle and plays it down in the aftermath. Traumatized and violated, Noelle reports her ordeal to the appropriate channels to no avail. She then decides to take matters into her own hands, heading down a dark route of revenge which heartbreakingly is all she has left. M.F.A is astonishingly brave as it highlights the ignorance and hypocrisy surrounding reported rape and the many women who face suffering in silence. The approach the film takes is bold without being exploitative or highly controversial but strongly gets its message across. Francesca Eastwood gives the performance of the year in a transformative role with layers of character development and a realistic arc, from her vulnerable beginnings to the astounding journey she takes. M.F.A is a prime example of the dynamicity of the genre and how it can successfully display a very real but disturbing issue and glare a light on that. It is wholly frustrating but will hopefully spark a conversation that society absolutely needs to have. Uncompromising, confrontational and powerful in its execution, M.F.A needs to be seen and spoken about.

2. 68 Kill (2017)

  • Directed By Trent Haaga
  • USA

68 Kill

Annalynne McCord stars as the baddest bitch of them all in this fast-paced, high octane, comedic thriller. Soaked in exploitation, 68 Kill delivers the “perfect midnight movie” and then some. Perfectly placed in the 12am slot on the first night of the festival, 68 Kill fought any festival jet lag away as its thrilling nature keeps the audience engrossed from start to finish. Featuring a slew of reprehensible characters that will kill, maim and mangle to get their hands on cold hard cash, 68 Kill ensures edge of the seat action until those end credits roll. The cast gel exceptionally well together, with Matthew Gray Gubler’s sweet-natured Chip finding himself in a bizarre, unexpected situation, torn between two crazed beauties with more outrageousness to come. A surprise performance is delivered from Sheila Vand, from the mid-way point as a ruthless, gothic store clerk. 68 Kill is a movie Tarantino could be proud of and thematically it has all the ingredients in place to homage his brand of filmmaking. Tasteless, indulgent, unapologetically trashy and completely in your face, 68 Kill is one of 2017’s and Celluloid Screams most exciting offerings.

1. Better Watch Out (2017)

  • Directed by Chris Peckover
  • USA/Australia 

Better Watch out

Christmas has come early with this fantastic, festive fright flick. Better Watch Out encompasses all the components of the killer Christmas movie while embodying its own unique capability. This is a home invasion like no other that supplies nerve-shredding suspense with darkly thought out humour. The plot centers on hormonally-charged twelve-year-old Luke (Levi Miller), a regular Suburban kid who anticipates an evening alone with his babysitter, Ashley (Olivia DeJonge). Having already established a comfortable rapport with each other, Luke’s chances of finally confessing his feelings don’t go quite to plan when they are targeted by an unknown assailant, subsequently becoming embroiled in a twisted cat and mouse game with shocking consequences. Better Watch Out incorporates delightful twists and turns that will supply shocks and surprises for its audience. It is advisable to enter this film totally blind to experience the punch it packs! The bright, festive aesthetic the film displays provides a welcome contrast to the more darker themes. It’s a crowd-pleaser from start to finish with exceptional performances from its young cast. Much like Andrew Muschetti’s IT (2017), kid-cast led horror films are proving to be a hit right now and this is no exception. If you enjoyed Netflix favourite, The Babysitter (2017) then you’re going to love, Better Watch Out.

Well, there we have it, my top five personal outstanding feature films of Celluloid Screams 2017. Comment below if you agree or disagree with my choices and let me know which films hit the right note with you at the sensational Sheffield festival.

Hayley Alice Roberts

Hayley’s Horror Reviews

 

Sights to Behold: Celluloid Screams 2017

Posted in Horror Attractions, Horror Festivals, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 14, 2017 by Hayley's Horror Reviews

On Friday the 20th October, the ninth edition of Sheffield Horror festival Celluloid Screams will commence, promising eager festival attendees that they have such sights to show us. The popular festival has one epic schedule planned featuring a range of classic horror, brand new releases and special events to keep bloodthirsty fans satisfied over the two and a half days.

celluloid screams 2017

I have consecutively attended the festival since 2011 and I’m beyond excited to see what 2017 has in store. Alongside my local horror festival Abertoir, Celluloid Screams is an event that I look forward to each year as it delivers a brilliantly arranged programme that is accessible for fans of a range of sub-genres. The welcoming, community atmosphere also plays a key role in why this festival remains one of the highlights of my year.

This year, the festival programmers led by Robert Nevitt have excelled themselves by providing us with so many exceptional films to look forward to. The proceedings kick off with festival favorites Aaron Moorhead and Justin Benson’s, cult-focused thriller, The Endless, followed by the eagerly anticipated British haunt-fest, Borley Rectory featuring a Q&A with the film’s director Ashley Thorpe. Other highlights to look forward to over the spooktacular weekend include closing film, Better Watch Out, a festive Christmas chiller, the trope-defying Tragedy Girls, the long awaited sequel, Creep 2 and of course the mysterious secret film.

tragedy girls

The main attraction however will be a special showcase of the popular BBC anthology series, Inside No. 9. Both creators and stars, the immensely talented Steve Pemberton and Reece Shearsmith will be in attendance to hand pick their favorite episodes and indulge their fans in a Q&A following the screening. With the impending revival of their warped, cult comedy, The League of Gentleman returning to television screens in the foreseeable, this event will prove to be a must-see.

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suspiria

Celluloid Screams will be screening not just one but two iconic classics on the big screen. We will feast our eyeballs on the stunning 4K restoration of Dario Argento’s exquisite masterpiece, Suspiria (1977) as well as a special 30th anniversary screening of Clive Barker’s incredible, Hellraiser (1987) with actor Nicholas Vince (famed for playing the role of the Chatterer) and special effects supervisor, Geoff Portass in attendance, partaking in a Q&A session following the film.

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With an array of films from all over the world, innovative short film screenings and a euro-horror celebrated art exhibition, it is fair to say that we are in for one hell of a weekend!

Keep up to date via my Facebook page, Hayley’s Horror Reviews and twitter account @WelshDemoness throughout the festival for plenty of updates.

http://celluloidscreams.co.uk/

Hayley Alice Roberts

Hayley’s Horror Reviews.  

Evil Selfie (2016): Short Film Review

Posted in Horror Festivals, Short Scares with tags , , , , , , , on June 15, 2017 by Hayley's Horror Reviews

Eros Bosi directs and stars in his debut short film, Evil Selfie. This Italian supernatural short takes society’s fixation with the worldwide ‘phenomena’ of the ‘selfie’ to extraordinary heights.

A ghostly presence stalks a ‘selfie mad’ couple who venture off to a picturesque woodland area in their car, as you do in horror movies! Evil Selfie is a black comedy that blends exaggerated scenarios with elements of spookiness. It’s evident that the project is a labor of love for it’s director, paying homage to familiar genre tropes while making a statement on an influential component of recent pop culture.

Featuring striking visuals and crisp cinematography, Evil Selfie is a slick, fast paced effort. The FX  courtesy of Pasquale Miele and make up effects by Amanda Rosi are well done and of a professional standard, providing the ghostly presence with a disturbing appearance. A commendable aspect about the film is that instead of going down the route of appearing dark and dank to achieve atmosphere, the bulk of the film is set outdoors in broad daylight which aids a more unsuspecting vibe for when something sinister is likely to strike.

 

As a new filmmaker, Bosi has collaborated with more experienced industry figures within the Italian horror circuit. Luca Alessandro who co-wrote and co-directed 2013’s The Pyramid and Alex Visani who produced the aforementioned episodic movie were both on board to lend a hand to Bosi throughout the process of creating his debut short film; with a creditable end result.

Evil Selfie is very much an audience film and would play well at frightening film festivals with the potential to initiate both laughs and scares from it’s prospective viewers. It cleverly conveys it’s concept without taking itself too seriously and has fun with what it does.

Evil Selfie was shot in Bosi’s hometown of Terni, utilizing it’s stunning locations greatly. The film premiered at Narnia Terror Night in November 2016, a festival devoted to supporting independent, Italian cinema.

Check out Bosi’s John Carpenter influenced trailer below. It comes as  no surprise that the subject of the ‘selfie’ will grow more prevalent in contemporary horror with Evil Selfie imaginatively echoing back to Carpenter’s cult classic, They Live (1988) in it’s themes. The link between society’s indulgent obsession of social media and horror is an interesting subject to explore, reinforcing the notion that we are in danger of losing sight of what’s around us while we are glued to our devices.

Bosi has cemented himself as a talented director and has a promising career ahead of him.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sFh2PzWg2go

Hayley Alice Roberts

Hayley’s Horror Reviews

 

Writing Horror: Interview with Author/Playwright Dan Weatherer

Posted in Horror Festivals, Horror Interviews with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 24, 2017 by Hayley's Horror Reviews

The most excellent aspect of Horror is how it holds appeal and can be adapted across all different mediums. In this interview I speak to the very versatile writer Dan Weatherer, who has written for the page, stage and screen, spilling the scares from novels to short films. He announced this week that he is working on a true crime piece, exploring the case of the notorious Dr. Crippen for a brand new novel. Not only that, his impressively darkly comedic short film Beige will screen at this year’s Stoke Your Fires Film Festival. He has also been shortlisted for an award for his collection Neverlight for the Arnold Bennett Literary Prize.

Legend-of-the-Chained-Oak Dan Weatherer

Before we get into the interview where Dan discusses his writing roots and upcoming projects, here is a little bit more info about the man behind then pen:

Dan Weatherer is represented by The Cherry Weiner Literary Agency (Author).

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Award-winning author Dan Weatherer, was first published by Haunted Magazine in Spring, 2013. The Legend of the Chained Oak was an immediate success and was made into a short film which won the award for ‘Best Horror’ at the Portobello Independent Film Festival (2014), ‘Best Short’ at The Bram Stoker International Film Festival (2014) and also the ‘Best UK Short Film’ award at the Stoke Your Fires Film Festival 2014. The film featured at numerous film festivals around the world during 2014. The premiere screening took place in his hometown of Cheadle.

In 2015 Dan was shortlisted for the prestigious position of Staffordshire Poet Laureate 2016-2018.

Aside from the publication of numerous short stories with a multitude of presses, his next major project was a solo collection of short stories titled The Soul That Screamed (Winner of the Preditors & Editors™ Readers’ Poll ‘Best Anthology 2013’.)

A further two collections Only the Good Burn Bright (Spring 2015, James Ward Kirk Fiction) and Neverlight (Spring 2016, Spectral Press) quickly followed. In 2017, Neverlight was shortlisted for the first annual Arnold Bennett Literary Prize.

His first non-fiction book titled ‘What Dwells Within’ was released in the Autumn of 2015 and details the life’s work of paranormal investigator Jayne Harris.

An accomplished playwright, Dan was a finalist in the Blackshaw Showcase Award 2016 and a two-time finalist of the Congleton Players One Act Festival, 2016. Dan has had several of his plays appear at festivals and fringe events.

Completed novels The Underclass and The Tainted Isle are currently with his agent. Expect to see The Dead Stage, a book detailing Dan’s experiences as a novice playwright appear via Crystal Lake Publishing in 2018.

Continuing on from the success of Legend of the Chained Oak, 2017 has seen Dan’s short film Beige added to The British Comedy Guide, and it continues to appear at film festivals nationwide.

Dan lives in Staffordshire, where is married to his wife Jenni and is a (proud) full-time dad to his daughter Bethany, and his son Nathan.

 

  1. What inspired you to become a writer?

As a child I always enjoyed creative writing, though never gave serious thought to a career as an author.

I was made redundant in 2013, and decided that I would try my hand at writing, now having time to dedicate to the craft. At the time, my daughter was two years old, and I fit my writing around her needs. My son is now aged two, and I still continue to work the same way. Being a full-time parent and writer seems to work for me, though the two aren’t without their challenges!

 

  1. You’ve written literature and written for the screen and stage, do you have a favourite medium or do you enjoy them all in equal measures?

I enjoy them all equally. Each medium presents its own challenges and rewards.

Writing for the screen is probably the most instantly gratifying, in that you write the action exactly as you intend the audience to see it on screen. Strong dialogue is a key factor in a good screenplay, but much of the writing centres on what the audience “sees” on screen.

Books enable you to delve deeper into a character’s mind-set, and literally construct the world around them. Every part of a characters psychological make-up is explored, resulting in a much richer final product.

Writing for the stage falls some way between writing for films/books. Again, very little direction is supplied by the author (leaving room for the actor/director to craft the piece as they interpret it), but the dialogue tends to drive the story here, as opposed to the visual element of film.

I find that stage plays are ideally suited to telling stories involving fewer characters/locations, where the level of intimacy afforded by a live performance heightens the impact of the piece.

Poster

  1. Your first publication The Legend of the Chained Oak was adapted into a short film as was your stage play Beige. What was it like transitioning those works to film?

The Legend of the Chained Oak was my first introduction to film, and I learned a lot working on the project.

The film is actually a spin-off from my original story, and was entirely written to suit our non-existent budget, and limited shoot time.

Very little was scripted. The actors were given the outcome of the scene, and much of their dialogue was improvised. I would argue that this lends a natural feel to the film, though must add that this is due to the strength of the actors involved.

However, all of my screenplays/stage plays since have been tightly scripted. While I do agree that the method above can achieve results, most projects require a solid foundation of dialogue; Beige being a perfect example of this.

 

  1. What appeals to you about the horror genre?

There are so many angles with which the genre can be approached. I’d say much of my work could be classed as dark-fiction, as opposed to horror.

It is rare that I write anything that could be classed as outright horror, choosing instead to deliver more subtle, but equally unnerving pieces.

However, my recent short story/screenplay ‘The Home’, is possibly the most horror orientated piece I have written to date!

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  1. You’re working on an upcoming project that centres on the infamous murderer, Dr Hawley Crippen. What interests you about true crime and what is your overall goal with the piece?

I remember visiting The Chamber of Horrors, in Blackpool, as a child. One of the exhibitions featured Dr Crippen and his dismembered wife, Cora; it was an image that remained with me for many years.

I’d often recall the blank expression on the Doctor’s face, and I’d wonder what possessed him to commit the atrocity that he was executed for.

Many years later, I discovered that there was new evidence with regards to the case, and having read the report, decided to retell the story of Dr Crippen as a stage play.

The idea to further develop the story into a novel was one I have been toying with for some time. Now, having started work, I can attest that I will be supplying a much richer story than my stage play first hinted, and I am having fun exploring the minds of the characters.

Of course, this is to be a work of fiction – where I present a possible alternative theory as to what happened to Cora Crippen. However, it is based on a true story. I aim to present Dr Crippen, not as a monster, but as a person, flawed though he may be, and attempt to explain his actions.

Time will tell if I am able to achieve this.

I will say that I do believe he is guilty of murder…

 

  1. What do you think makes a genuinely scary story?

The reader has to feel for the characters. If bad things happen to them (and they inevitably do), the reader will feel. Whether you choose to scare the reader, or instil a sense of warmth, neither is achievable if your characters are throwaway.

 

  1. What has been your favourite project to work on?

Tough question. Each has its merits. However, I had great fun working on a script for a well know Hollywood horror franchise…

That script is now in the hands of my agent.

Birmingham Horror Con Halloween

  1. You will be showcasing your work at Birmingham Horror Con this Halloween, what are you most looking forward to about the event?

It probably sounds extremely unprofessional, but I’m looking forward to exploring the convention, and enjoying it as an attendee, rather than a stall holder.

I will be showcasing my short films, and hosting a Q & A panel afterwards, but most of my time will be spent meeting other authors/film makers working in the genre. These are people I respect, yet have only ever spoken to online. It will be great to say hello in person!

 

  1. Who are your literary influences?

Clive Barker, Stephen King, James Herbert, and Arnold Bennett. (Arnold did not write dark-fiction. He is the most successful author to come from my home city, and I am an admirer of both his work and his legacy.)

 

  1. What advice do you have for new and aspiring writers?

Rejection is never a “no.” It’s a “not for me.” Don’t ever let anybody tell you that you can’t – you just need to find that one person who believes in your work as much as you do.

I would like to thank Dan for taking his time to do this interview with me. Be sure to check out all of his awesome works.

For more information about Dan and his work, visit www.danweatherer.com 

Hayley Alice Roberts

Hayley’s Horror Reviews.

Agatha (2015, short) Review

Posted in Horror Festivals with tags , , , , , , , on January 23, 2017 by Hayley's Horror Reviews

In the late 1800’s a young orphan known as Sophie (Louise Ogle) earns her keep by delivering slabs of meat to an ambiguous creature that resides at the top of the stairs in an old, eerie mansion. As Sophie climbs the stairs night after night her curiosity grows as to what inhabits that room. Is she prepared to discover the sinister presence that lurks in the shadows? Who is Agatha and what does she want…?

agatha

Written and Directed by Timothy Vandenberg, Agatha is a prelude to what will eventually become a feature film, expanding on the mysterious narrative even further. Agatha is genuinely creepy in it’s tone and Vandenberg wholly utilizes the gothic location achieving a constant sense of tension and dread. With a concept such as this it would be so easy to throw in jump scares in order to unsettle and surprise the audience however the direction it takes is much more unnerving, notably with the use of rising music as Sophie enters the room.

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Shrouded in darkness with the prime focus on young Sophie’s reactions and the close ups of the unappealing food she is made to deliver, Agatha makes for a short but stomach churning viewing. Having the protagonist as a seven year old child makes the piece more heart-rendering as she is all alone and vulnerable in a frightening situation. Old photographs are extremely creepy and the photo on display with the baby’s face scratched out proves effective, allowing the audience to wonder what is wrong with Agatha.

There is plenty of scope to take the story further and heaps of unanswered questions and backstories to explore, particularly the mother character (Penny Kohut) and her motivations.

Agatha is a spine-chilling period piece with quality production values and gallons of potential for a much longer run time. Bring on the creep-fest!

In Autumn 2016, Agatha premiered at Screamfest LA in the Shorts Block. 

Watch the Trailer for Agatha Here:

https://youtu.be/kRNuI0ZqxxY

Hayley Alice Roberts

Hayley’s Horror Reviews