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**Fifth Anniversary Review** Hayley’s Top 10 Favourite Horror Death Scenes Of All Time

Posted in Anniversary Pieces, Ghostface Girls, Love Horror with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 18, 2016 by Hayley's Horror Reviews

Five years ago I was a film and television student in my first year at University. I decided to start a blog as a side project separate from my studies. It began as a way to express my views on recent films both independent and mainstream that I’d seen from all genres. Naturally, the first review I ever wrote was of Scream 4 (2011) then eventually I made the site completely horror specific and Hayley’s Horror Reviews is what it is today. Several great opportunities have come my way since beginning the blog, including the chance to get to know and review the work of a number of talented filmmakers. I am now very lucky to be writing for the Horror Movie review site LoveHorror.co.uk and working alongside Caitlyn Downs (from Scared Sheepless) on our collaborative project Ghostface Girls where we provide festival video coverage and record podcasts. Our next event will be the UK’s Horror Con in July 2016!

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In previous years my anniversary reviews have covered My Top 10 Horror Films of all time (since 2011 it has more than likely altered!), Urban Legends on screen and behind the scenes, why we watch Horror Films and last year my favorite underrated slashers. This year I’m taking on a countdown of a subject I’m surprised I haven’t covered by now. It’s all about the visual effects as I reveal my personal favorite horror movie death scenes. Death scenes are at the core of horror movies, even if a film might be particularly badly executed sometimes the saving grace can be some good old splatter. On the opposite end of the spectrum sometimes it’s what you don’t see and what’s implied that can really get under the skin. There’s also nothing more heart-breaking for a horror fan than when one of your favorite characters is hacked to pieces leading to emotional trauma!

Here are my top Horror Movie death scenes of all time! Remember folks, as always its subjective.

There will be spoilers, so get that TV on if you haven’t seen any or some of these films and come back to this article.

**WARNING** This Article will include blood, guts, gore and strong language. Not for the faint-hearted! 

Comment below if you agree or disagree with my choices or tweet me on @Hayleyr1989.

10. Final Destination (2000): Terry Chaney is splattered by a bus!

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To kick things off is a death scene so quick and unexpected it’s pure brilliance! This moment marked the beginning of the darkly twisted sense of humour in the Final Destination franchise. Up until this point Alex Browning (Devon Sawa) and his friends have survived a harrowing plane crash and are grieving over the apparent “suicide” of best friend Tod (Chad Donella) whose brother died on Flight 180. Both scenes deliver a suspenseful build up with gruesome results. This moment however takes place in the middle of the day, Alex and love interest Clear Rivers (Ali Larter) are trying to figure out death’s design. Enter rival Carter (Kerr Smith) and girlfriend Terry (Amanda Detmer). Carter is convinced that Alex is to blame for the deaths of the plane victims as well as Tod but he soon gets more than he bargained for! While antagonizing Alex, his long-suffering girlfriend finally snaps. In an ironic speech, Terry speaks about never wasting another second of her life and states Carter should have better things to do than fight with Alex. She then utters the immortal lines of “you can just drop fucking dead!”. Backing into the road Terry is hit by an incoming bus and the remaining survivors recoil in horror as her blood splatters on their faces. It’s the twisted irony of this scene that makes it surprising and thrilling letting the audience know that anyone can go at any time by any means.

9. Zombie Flesh Eaters (AKA. Zombi 2) (1979): Eye Splinter Scene

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Even without context the eye splinter scene from Lucio Fulci’s notorious ‘video nasty’ Zombie Flesh Eaters is an iconic cinematic moment in horror. The scene is so sqiurmworthy as you (literally!) see it coming a mile off but it doesn’t let up on the suspense. Paola, the wife of Richard Johnson’s character Dr. David Menard is alone in the house when a zombie breaks in. Actress Olga Karlatos displays a genuine look of horror as her vulnerable character attempts to bombard the Zombie from entering the house. Unluckily for her she is dragged through the door and impaled right through the eye with a piece of splintered wood. Her eye is pierced right through in a masterful visual effect, we see the eye squelched and the object penetrate right through her skull!  The moment sets the tone for the carnage to come making it one of Italian Horror’s nastiest kills.

8. I Spit on Your Grave (1978): Blood Bath

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The second video nasty on this list. I Spit on Your Grave is unapologetically exploitative cinema centering on the brutal, unrelenting rape of a young woman. Aspiring writer Jennifer (Camille Keating) retreats to the backwoods as she works on her novel, but she is horrifically brutalized and gang-raped by a group of local men. However, it wouldn’t be a rape-revenge film without a nasty dose of payback! After some time has passed Jennifer is back tougher and stronger than ever as she sets about to seek vengeance on her attackers. In one of the film’s most gruesome scenes Jennifer lures ring leader Johnny (Eron Tabor) into her car, inviting him around for some wet, and bubbly fun…or so he thinks! Jennifer hides a knife under the bath mat and as she begins to seduce Johnny when he least expects it she takes a knife to his most sensitive area!! It takes him a few moments to comprehend what’s happening while Jennifer leaves him there to bleed to death. She proceeds to lock him in the bath room and makes her way downstairs while Johnny yells that he can’t stop the bleeding. She drowns his screams out with a nice bit of classical music. The scene is particularly disturbing as Jennifer allows herself to be in a sexual situation with her rapist. Johnny completely goes along with it showing what a horrendous character he really is. It’s so well executed and unsettling, making ‘blood bath’ from I Spit on Your Grave one of cinemas best revenge death scenes of all time.

7. Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors (1987): Welcome to Prime Time Bitch!

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There are many inventive death scenes in the most highly regarded Elm Street Sequel Dream Warriors but this one had to be selected as it captures Freddy Krueger’s (Robert Englund) darkly menacing, twisted sense of humor. While the Puppet Master moment and Needle fingers sequence are exceptionally creative and unique death scenes it’s difficult to overlook fame-seeking Jennifer’s (Penelope Sudrow) TV demise. This moment is fourth wall breaking and surreal as Freddy possesses the television, manifesting himself onto a late night talk show. The television turns static encouraging Jennifer to approach it. In a crazy visual effect mechanical arms emerge from the sides of the television, clutching Jennifer. Freddy materializes from the top of the television set sprouting antennas. He then smashes her skull through the television set uttering the iconic line “Welcome to prime time, bitch!”. The Elm Street franchise is known for its elaborate and creative death scenes that are more entertaining than a man in a mask just slashing with a knife. This scene is a solid example of how the franchise utilizes its special effects accompanied with quirky dialogue enhancing that when it comes down to Freddy Krueger anything is literally possible!

6. The Burning (1981): We’ve found our canoe!

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The Burning appeared on my list last year as one of my favorite underrated slasher films. It centers on a scorned caretaker who seeks revenge on the inhabitants of a summer camp where he suffered a horrific accident several years previous. It’s under the radar due to the success of Friday the 13th (1980) but then became infamous in the UK once it appeared on the Video Nasties list, and this death scene is the reason why! Tom Savini’s sensational gory FX during this scene cemented The Burning as being one of the first to receive it’s ‘video nasty’ reputation. A few of the camper’s head down the lake on a makeshift raft in order to fetch their canoe back. The typical teenagers argue while rowing but become excitable as they get nearer to the abandoned canoe. The scene is set up well using a sense of dread as they become closer and closer. No matter how many times you watch it and are aware what lies ahead it’s still shocking as the killer Cropsy (Lou David) appears from the canoe with his shears and the bloody massacre commences! This moment of the film features the image that appeared on the iconic cover art of Cropsy’s silhouette holding up the shears. It’s pretty harrowing as unlike the majority of slasher films the teenagers cast in the film genuinely look their age rather than having 25-year-old’s playing a 16-year-old’s. The fact that it takes place in broad daylight in an idyllic location makes this deadly moment even more horrific.

5. Hellraiser (1987): Jesus Wept

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This scene is one of my earliest, goriest cinematic memories and has made the list for being downright gruesome. At a young age this was one of the coolest death scenes in horror that I’d ever seen. It’s time for Uncle Frank (Sean Chapman) to get his just desserts at the hands of the Cenobites. Wearing the meat suit of his brother Larry (Andrew Robinson) he attempts to kill niece Kirsty (Ashley Laurence) in the attic but thankfully (as thankful as it gets in a horror movie situation!) Pinhead (Doug Bradley) and his demons appear ready to drag Frank’s damaged soul directly back to hell. Pinhead promised he had “such sights to show” us and this unrelentingly proved what the Cenobites were capable of. There’s an otherworldly presence to the scene with the bell chime ringing and the mist surrounding the attic. Hellraiser was famed for its dynamic make up effects, with Pinhead’s appearance making him an intriguing horror villain; but it’s Frank’s demise that is as grizzly and gory as it gets. As he raises a blade to Kirsty he is stopped in his tracks with a hook through the hand, chaining him to the Cenobites world forever. Hooks pierce his skin, tearing his face. As Kirsty recoils in sheer disgust Frank says “Jesus Wept” before being ripped apart, with blood and guts galore!

4. Inbred (2011): Dwight’s Dirrrrty Death!

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Over the past five years Inbred has become one of my favorite horror films. One of the several reasons is due to its creatively nasty death scenes. It stands out in what it does, with strong character development allowing the audience to empathize with its protagonists, as well as a twisted sense of tongue in cheek humor that equally puts us on the side of the villains. It’s somewhat of a black comedy but goes right for the jugular with a set of cruel and mean spirited methods of bumping off its victims. The warped villagers of Mortlake attend a show put on by local landlord Jim (Seamus O’Neill). Having already killed off one of the young lads involving vegetables and a horse, this time the Inbred’s capture Dwight (Chris Waller), the remaining protector of the group. Sacrificing himself for the safety of his care worker and fellow youth offenders, Dwight is subjected to a rather dirrrrrrty demise! Tied to a chair and forced to wear a wig, he is cruelly tormented by a man resembling a droog from A Clockwork Orange (1971) who proceeds to empty a hosepipe of shit down Dwight’s throat until he explodes all over the unusual members of the audience! It needs to be seen to be believed but commended for its use of old school FX over CGI giving us an old school backwoods bloodbath!

3. Der Fan (AKA. Trance) (1982): Killer Obsession

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Der Fan is a film I’ve mentioned a bunch of times on the site. An undiscovered gem that screened at Celluloid Screams in 2013, Der Fan enters unexpected territory with an unforgettable and bizarrely crafted death scene. A German Exploitation film, it pushed the boundaries with its female lead being played by a 16-year-old. Household name Desiree Nobuch of Radio Luxenburg fame played psycho fan Simone and did full frontal nudity in the film as well as acted out a scene of murder and cannibalism which certainly would not be done in cinema today! Simone sleeps with R (Bodo Steiger), a Gary Numan inspired pop star who she’s absolutely obsessed with. When reality bites and Simone becomes another used fan girl to R what happens next is completely out of the left field. In my original review I described it as one of the most “chilling and extreme” deaths in cinema. It’s lengthy, horrific, controversial and unsettling leaving the viewer feeling grubby once the credits roll, making it feel like a completely different film from the one that started. This is one I won’t spoil for you however if you’ve already had the experience of watching this underrated exploitation check out my original review.

2.Scream 2 (1997): Randy Meeks Death Scene

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Master team Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson taught us no one was safe in their iconic slasher-revival Scream. When Drew Barrymoore is killed off in the opening moments of a film it’s guaranteed that anything can happen! Scream 2 is the strongest sequel in the franchise as it raised the stakes. There are so many excellent set pieces in the entire film from the cinema slashing’s at the beginning to Sarah Michelle Gellar’s brutal demise being stabbed in the back and thrown out of a window; however, the death that really cuts close to the bone is that of Jamie Kennedy’s popular character Randy Meeks. Self-confessed “movie buff” Randy survived Billy Loomis (Skeet Ulrich) and Stu Macher’s (Matthew Lillard) reign of terror in the first installment closely following the horror movie survival rules. But even he knows that he could be disposable as a new Ghostface stalks the campus of Windsor College. Randy’s death scene is well executed and unexpected. The most shocking aspect is that unlike the previous deaths this one takes place in broad daylight. He is pulled into Gale’s (Courtney Cox) news van and stabbed repeatedly. It’s horrific as it goes unnoticed by crowds of people on the campus. The camera focuses on the van’s wing mirror as Randy is brutally killed, a group of students unknowingly walk by with a boom box drowning out his screams of pain! His bloodied face is then revealed. It’s tragic and heart-breaking as he never does get the girl and is a missing presence from the dynamics of the core characters. It’s certain that it’s Mrs Loomis (Laurie Metcalf) who murders Randy as she viciously attacks him for speaking “poorly” of her delightful son Billy in an act of revenge. The most ironic element of Randy’s death is because he knows the rules of a horror movie inside and out the killer cleverly catches him at the most unexpected moment and doesn’t wait until dark. Craven and Williamson kept the franchise fresh with surprises like this!

  1. I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997): Death of the Beauty Queen 

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What sets I Know What You Did Last Summer apart from its slasher counterparts is the well written and well-acted main characters. Sarah Michelle Gellar gives a tragic performance as Helen Shivers, the former Beauty Queen who loses her future after being involved in a hit and run and an ill thought out cover-up. After she witnesses the murder of her boyfriend Barry (Ryan Phillippe) at the hands of the psychotic fisherman; the police do next to nothing to help her. Helen’s death scene is harrowing as she almost makes it to safety. There’s a slow-paced build-up of tension from escaping a crashed police car to running for her life and hiding out in her sister’s store; Helen fights for survival. Her death isn’t shown explicitly but is incredibly effective and atmospheric set to a chilling score composed by John Debney. Helen falls from the stores window but then finds an alleyway leading to the 4th July Summer parade. Fireworks blast into the air and there’s a sense of relief; albeit momentarily, Helen then approaches the parade but becomes distracted and looks behind her. She is then face to face with the evil fisherman and slashed with his sharp hook amongst a stack of tires. There’s quick cuts, flashing lights and the sound of screams but one thing is certain, the true heroine of the film has met her demise. Helen’s body is later discovered by traumatized best friend Julie (Jennifer Love Hewitt) on the fisherman’s boat officially confirming there is no return for her within future films in the series. It’s Gellar’s helpless performance as the doomed young woman that hits hard with emotional impact. As sad as the scene is it’s essential to the progression of the film as many fans agree if Julie had been the one to meet her maker it wouldn’t have achieved the same upsetting impact. Helen’s death goes to show that you don’t need to go gory to execute an effective and gut-wrenching death scene.

As always thank you for reading and supporting Hayley’s Horror Reviews.

….

Hayley Alice Roberts.

What happened in 97′ should stay in 97′! Thoughts on the Re-boot.

Posted in Press Release with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 20, 2014 by Hayley's Horror Reviews

**Contains Some Spoilers**

I Know What You Did Last Summer has always been somewhat of a guilty pleasure. Released in 1997 hot on the heels of the teen slasher revival thanks to Scream (1996), IKWYDLS showcased a young, talented cast of the time including Sarah Michelle Gellar and Ryan Phillipee; arguably the film is filled with nonsensical plot-holes and unbelievable scenarios but still manages to engage the viewer. Maybe nostalgic tainted glasses are at play here but there is something about the tone of the film that comes across at unnerving and is what it is a cheesy slasher that takes itself too seriously at times.

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Originally a teen thriller 1970’s novel by Lois Duncan, the film version was far removed from what the book intended. In Duncan’s novel four teens Barry, Helen, Julie and Ray are involved in an accidental hit and run resulting in the death of a young child, without giving too much away the teens are targeted by a mysterious stalker in which the novel culminates in a heart-pounding satisfying finale that unfortunately would be difficult to translate over to film. In Kevin Williamson’s script, the teens led by popular actress Jennifer Love Hewitt as protagonist Julie James are also involved in a hit and run but with that of a Fisherman with a dark secret who manages to return from his shallow grave to warn the teens he knows and wants revenge! Ben Willis is more or less an unmemorable villain and terribly hammy, failing to match the heights of Michael Myers, Freddy Kruger and even Ghostface he is mostly forgotten.

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Lois Duncan was less than impressed at the ‘hot new slasher movie’ in town. Sitting in the cinema back in 97′ she was disturbed to discover her mystery thriller had been transformed into a typical horror movie featuring young women in danger, some even ending up killed. This was in bad taste considering Duncan’s daughter had been brutally murdered back in 1989.  This in-depth article covers the tragic story of a mother’s anguish in bringing her daughter’s killers to justice. Williamson himself wasn’t completely at blame here. In his original script that was potentially in the works before he hit the big time with Scream, he had treated the film as a suspenseful thriller where no slashing took place until much later on. As expected this didn’t test well with audiences therefore director Jim Gillespie had to go back and shoot a death scene for minor character Max (Johnny Galeki) to satisfy audiences blood-thirsty taste buds and up the ante to determine Ben Willis really meant business.

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While popular in its time, the film grossed $125,586,134 at the Box Office and won a few awards e.g. MTV. An awesome soundtrack featuring tracks from Korn, The Offspring, Type O Negative and Hooverphonic was released.  Despite Sarah Michelle Gellar’s powerhouse performance as Helen Shivers and believable chemistry with Ryan Phillipee’s Barry Cox, I Know What You Did Last Summer isn’t a film that’s heavily discussed among the horror community as its simply a product of its time much like a slew of forgettable 80’s Slashers that emerged following Friday the Thirteenth etc.

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News just in Oculus director Mike Flanagan is penning a new script in plans to re-boot the movie which in itself seems quite random. Flanagan has stated he will not be directing or producing however original producer Neil H. Mortiz is said to be on board. Oculus may have done commercially well however among the convoluted plot it didn’t come across as anything that hadn’t been done before therefore I suspect a remake of IKWYDLS won’t be a vast improvement on the original. Flanagan is supposedly going to create a screenplay closer to the original book which is completely problematic.

As a franchise it failed, the sequel I Still Know What You Did Last Summer was rushed out in 1998 and left viewers on a cliffhanger and a 2006 straight-to-DVD monstrosity I’ll Always Know What You Did Last Summer followed and that was that. Various rumours emerged over the years that Love Hewitt and Freddie Prinze Jr would return in a follow-up particularly after Scream 4 but nothing was made concrete regarding the title until now.

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 No casting information has been revealed as of yet but the film is allegedly planned for a 2016 release, it will be interesting to see how this project develops despite how unnecessary it seems. Remakes are just tiresome and Hollywood has killed the horror genre. What is ultimately a product of the 90’s should stay in the 90’s…what next are we going to see a remake of Urban Legend?

 

Hayley Alice Roberts.

Hayley’s Horror Reviews.

 

 

 

Women In Horror Month: Final Girls and Psychotic Women. (3-1)

Posted in Women in Horror Recognition Month with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 19, 2014 by Hayley's Horror Reviews

Here is part five and the final piece of coverage celebrating the fifth annual Women in Horror Recognition Month. Earlier this month I began a countdown of who I consider to be the bravest final girls in horror as well as the most psychotic and deadly women. Narrowing it down out of a vast range of characters that have made an impact on our blood-splattered screens for decades has been tough and there’s plenty more I’d have liked to have included. A follow-up countdown next year may be a possibility. Now we’re onto the top three, it’s time to analyze my ultimate favorite genre women. The criteria set for these three is down to the impact they’ve had on the genre and on myself, their iconic status within Horror, how they’ve either set up recognizable tropes or challenged them and just for being downright awesome.

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I want to thank everyone for their support in reading my work. For all the shares, likes, re-tweets and comments. Your feedback is always more than welcome and its always brilliant to speak to like-minded fans. Let me know if you agree or disagree with my choices. Who do YOU think should be THE Woman of Horror?

I’d also like to give a personal thank you to Hannah Neurotica who has set up this amazing cause to address the restrictions and prejudices that many women have faced in the industry and to celebrate a genre that has so many phenomenal female contributors. Let’s all keep raising awareness for Women in Horror Recognition Month. Long may it continue…!

WARNING: There will be Spoilers!!

3. Mary Mason, American Mary (2012)

  • Played By Katharine Isabelle
  • Written and Directed By Jen and Sylvia Soska.

amermary01  It shouldn’t come as a surprise that sadistic surgeon Mary Mason (Katharine Isabelle) slashed her way onto this list. Interestingly, she is the first character included in this countdown who has been written and directed by women, which to a degree emphasizes the lack of strong, iconic female characters written by women for women within the genre. But when Mary splattered onto the Horror scene back in 2012 she certainly made her mark as the fabulous filmmakers Jen and Sylvia Soska (aka. The Twisted Twins) worked incredibly hard to promote the film, generating plenty of interest via social media and the film wound up being one of the most ‘must-see’ events in the horror genre that year. It also resulted in major studio Universal acquiring the rights to the film making it’s female directors a modern day industry success story. The film itself actually laments the disheartening experiences the Soska’s went through as striving filmmakers echoing the negativity and sleaziness they encountered amongst the film system.

One of the most fascinating pieces of horror to emerge this decade, American Mary is a modern day Universal Monster in every sense of the word. She is a deeply complex character with so many layers its hard not to be compelled by her story arc within the film from promising medical student to rogue body modification surgeon to psychotic woman. Mary is the embodiment of a woman who can be both highly intelligent and sexy. With an array of stylish yet provocative outfits, Mary looks amazing whether she’s covered in blood in a PVC apron or in the designer green dress created for her by Ruby Realgirl (Paula Lindberg). She knows what she has to do in order to survive and is not to be crossed with as deadly consequences will arise. The majority of the time Mary is cool, calm and collected which is vital as she carries out some obscure and unconventional methods of surgery in order to either please her clients or torture her victims. When a horrific incident happens to her she takes matters into her own hands enlisting the help of smitten club owner Billy (Antonio Cupo) and gentle giant, bodyguard Lance (Twan Holliday) in order to act out her revenge.

A master at her craft, its evident she relishes in the work she does, which molds her into a creative, beautiful yet feared woman. The majority of the time Mary is sarcastic and deadpan which underlines her disillusion with her unfortunate experiences. Her relationships with the other characters in the film is interesting. She doesn’t quite let them in and deals with her problems mainly alone. Her quasi-friendship with Betty Boop lookalike Beatrice (Tristan Risk) is one of the film’s highlights, with contrasting personalities and attitudes Beatrice tries her hardest to get to know what’s behind Mary’s exterior more so than other characters. Through Billy’s eyes she is seen as sensual yet frightening, comparatively to other women he hires at the club he holds more respect for Mary and there’s a genuine fondness on his part. She also manages to deceive Detective Dolor (John Emmet Tracy) for as long as she can demonstrating how double-crossing she can be while protecting herself and her unique body modification “business”.

A complex and compelling character, Mary continues to gain cult and iconic status providing Scream Queen Katharine Isabelle with another memorable role under her belt next to Ginger from Ginger Snaps (2000). Whether feared or admired, there’s certainly something about Mary!

2. Laurie Strode, Halloween Series (1978, 1981, 1998, 2002)

  • Played By Jamie Lee Curtis
  • Directed By John Carpenter
  • Written By John Carpenter and Debra Hill

laurie strode  Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) is one of the earliest examples and arguably the most famous of the ‘final girl’ trope. Despite not being the first horror heroine to come up against and survive a maniacal killer in the slasher territory (See. Jess, Black Christmas (1974) and Sally, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974) as earlier examples) she holds a great deal of significance. Laurie’s character and status as ‘the final girl’ has been famously examined by Carol Clover in Men, Women and Chainsaws and its become pretty much concrete that Halloween (1978) set the standard for the slasher films that came after it and coined several of the tropes that have been recognizable ever since. The term ‘Final Girl’ came from Clover who stated the attributes as being a strong female character and one that was distinct from other females within slashers. As us horror enthusiasts know if you’re the slutty blonde cheerleader your more likely going to die but if you’re the shy, bookish, virginal girl, you’re going to survive! The final girl is the one who realizes the extent of the threat facing her and its even suggested that once she confronts the killer and more than often stabs him with a knife (a penetrative motion) its used as a metaphor for her sexual frustration.

It seems as if ‘Final Girls’ during this period of horror were constructed as masculine, with their feminine qualities suppressed, they were in place more as an experience for cinematic terror. By having a female figure rather than a male the intent was to convey fear as women aren’t viewed as physically strong as men. It created more vulnerability when the final girl would face up against a killer twice her size.

Another attribute of ‘The Final Girl’ is having a gender neutral name which supports this idea that the role of the female in slasher films is for a male audience to be able to identify with. Clover’s theory however has been criticized for being problematic as it doesn’t suggest that the heroine reflects female identity and anxieties. Laurie in fact does display several of the characteristics Clover set out. Despite thwarting the killer at the climax and surviving, Clover’s focus on a male outlet has been argued against as Laurie is ultimately rescued by a male character Dr. Sam Loomis (Donald Pleasence). Through this she is not entirely an ‘active’ final girl who seeks out the killer herself but she is one step ahead of the other characters as she remains continually cautious and is smart enough to keep herself alive. Laurie is an early reference point for the trope however she does evolve over the years. In the sequel she is hospitalized but still displays more awareness, warning others about the boogeyman who attacked her, the doctors dismiss her fears and continue to sedate her. In Halloween II (1981) Laurie makes the connection that her attacker is in fact Michael Myers and also her brother. With that knowledge she is able to defeat him once more with the help of Loomis. During Halloween IV (1988)V (1989) and The Curse of Michael Myers (1995) she is presumed dead leaving behind a young daughter Jamie Lloyd (Danielle Harris) who becomes Myers next target. In Halloween H20: 20 Years Later (1998) its discovered that Laurie is alive and living behind a secret identity. Fragile and unable to cope with her past, she is on medication and a shadow of her former self, which makes her more human. This time round she has her teenage son John (Josh Hartnett) to protect as Michael targets his little sister once more. By the end Laurie gains the courage to fight back and finish off Michael Myers once and for all, beheading him with an axe. By this point Laurie had molded from the vulnerable teenager in the first installment to a stronger woman. Unfortunately Halloween:Resurrection (2002) exists, destroying everything the previous film had intended with the evolution of Laurie’s place as a final girl, by having Myers kill her off in an asylum in the films opening minutes. Allegedly Laurie had decapitated a security guard rather than Myers in H20.

As stated Laurie Strode is one of the most emblematic heroines to emerge from the genre. Even though she does fall into several categories that make up the traditional final girl, its not to say that she doesn’t display any feminine qualities. She begins as a teenage girl with insecurities and becomes a strong woman which is plenty for a female audience to relate to. Laurie is without a doubt the first notable final girl in the slasher sub-genre and a huge influence on all the strong horror females that came after her.

1. Sidney Prescott, Scream Series (1996, 1997, 2000, 2011)

  • Played By Neve Campbell
  • Directed By Wes Craven
  • Written By Kevin Williamson

scream4_06  The countdown has now reached an end and its time to finally discuss the feistiest female in Horror and that is Sidney Prescott (Neve Campbell) from the slick, post-modern Scream franchise.

If Laurie Strode was responsible for evoking ideas about ‘the final girl’ then Sidney Prescott was in place to challenge them. The 90’s were upon us and the horror genre was in dire need of a re-vamp. Precisely everything had been done by this point and filmmakers needed to find a way to keep on terrifying audiences who were now all too aware of the cliches and tropes thrown at them. Enter Kevin Williamson, a complete godsend. Williamson re-invented the genre with his quick-witted, self-aware but also brutal Scream (1996) along with the experienced genre director Wes Craven on board. Instead of re-hashing the same tired conventions, Williamson challenged them by creating a slasher film where the characters were conscious of being in one yet still met a bloody demise at the hands of an all new sinister serial killer, Ghostface (voiced by Roger L. Jackson) who knows these movies inside out and through the knowledge of the conventions is able to outsmart the targeted teens.

As a final girl Sidney on one hand does qualify for some of the attributes Clover discussed. She has a gender-neutral name and has intimacy issues. On the other hand she is clued up on how females in horror are constructed yet when faced with a slasher-type situation she acts on instinct rather than logic. That’s until the sequels where she becomes even more savvy on how to outsmart the knife-wielding masked murderer. The previously mentioned intimacy issues are down to trauma rather than just playing the good girl. Sidney’s mother was brutally butchered before the events of Scream (1996) however she eventually bows down to pressure from suspected boyfriend Billy Loomis (Skeet Ulrich) and sleeps with him right before the blood-curdling climax. Even more of a turning point is Billy does turn out to be one of the killers meaning in this instance rules have changed and Sidney not only has sex, she has sex with the villain which establishes what audiences thought they knew about horror conventions is about to change.

By Scream 4 (2011) Sidney has encountered and defeated seven serial killers that donne the Ghostface disguise all out for her blood. Sidney achieved somewhat of a sick, celebrity status as ‘everyone’s favorite victim’ even though she yearns for a normal life where she doesn’t have to look over her shoulder. She overcomes more than most, the death of her friends and her only stable boyfriend Derek (Jerry O’Connell) as well as family members attempting to massacre her yet she still comes out on top. There has been rumors over the years that if another Scream installment was to be made there is the possibility that Sidney may be killed off however that would be disrespectful to her character and legacy and would be taking it down the previously mentioned Halloween:Resurrection route, which would just be awful! What’s empowering about Sidney is she isn’t afraid to pull the trigger and takes no second chances when eliminating the threat. There has been criticism that technically Sidney is as bad as the killers in the franchise as in self-defense she murders them in equally bloody measures however given the situation any rational person would react similarly in order to save themselves and remaining friends. She does all she can to protect herself, in the sequel she stays around her friends and is given two bodyguards, in the third installment she is a broken woman who isolates herself in a highly-secured house before deciding to come out and face the danger rather than pushing her surviving friends away. By the fourth and most recent film Sidney is wiser and displays more confidence, she even becomes an author recounting her traumatic experiences as a way of catharsis.

Sidney Prescott is my number one female of horror because she is strong, empowered, determined, will always fight back and has a well-rounded character arc. Sidney is a survivor who has left just as much as an impact as Laurie before her through turning conventions on their head and giving genre audiences much more to expect from what a final girl is capable of.

Hayley Alice Roberts.

Hayley’s Horror Reviews.

Scream: The TV Series?

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 26, 2013 by Hayley's Horror Reviews

scream

So, the 1996 genre-defying slasher Scream franchise is now being pitched as a TV series? This rumor has been around for a while, however MTV have now confirmed that a pilot episode is going ahead. There is no confirmation on a writer or concept as of yet however it seems the project will be soon underway. As a die-hard fan of Scream 1-4 it comes as slightly disappointing news that the franchise can’t end on a high with 2011’s film (which in itself was arguably unneeded) and is being adapted for the small screen without any real thought to it. Wes Craven’s name is attached to the series, although at this point this is still a rumor, however judging by Scream 3 (2000) it proves that without Kevin Williamson’s witty, self-referential dialogue it will lack substance.

Williamson is busy working on his hit CW series The Vampire Diaries (2009-present) while there is currently no mention of Scream stalwarts Neve Campbell, Courtney Cox and David Arquette reprising their roles as Sidney, Gale and Dewey. MTV in recent years has been bombarded with trashy reality shows glamorizing teen pregnancy and featuring spoilt American brats e.g. My Super Sweet Sixteen, therefore it questions how a once, clever horror satire will fair next to this kind of line-up. Perhaps Ghost face will merge into these shows and kill off these self-indulgent idiots which in itself will be quite satisfying. A possibly commentary on the lack of quality in mainstream TV, critiquing popular culture is what Scream does at its best!

Scream-Cast

Will Scream: The Series pick up where Scream 4 left off and deal with the aftermath of the latest Woodsboro killings? That said, will it even be set in Woodsboro? Will it include the original characters from the first film, re-cast and be a teen show? What about a prequel that shows original killers Billy and Stu’s involvement in Sidney’s Mother’s death?? Or maybe the series will incorporate a whole different approach featuring a psycho obsessed with the iconic horror franchise, killing their victims by replicating the grisly murders of the first four films in a meta-narrative format?? Oh wait, that’s already been done in a non-budget, Scream appreciation independent film, Scream: Generations, which I believe is still on youtube and I highly recommend, its created for the fans by the fans.

With much speculation ahead, time will only tell how this show develops, fingers crossed they won’t tarnish the original movies and come up with something decent. Can Scream work as a series, will it even have enough material to work with on an episodic format? Guess this will all be answered in 2014!

Hayley Alice Roberts.

My Top 10 Horror Movies of 2011

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 27, 2011 by Hayley's Horror Reviews

With 2011 on its way out, here’s a look back on why it was the year for the horror film! 2011 saw a wide range of horror from all over the world which provided plenty of thrills, chills, suspense and all out gore. This countdown looks at the films that for me achieved all those aspects consisting of mainstream, foreign and independent titles.

10. “The Skin I Live In” (Original Title: “La piel que habito”)

  • Directed By Pedro Almodovar 
  • UK Release Date: 26th August 2011

 A unique piece of filmmaking, “The Skin I Live In” delves into the bizarre in a “Frankenstein”-type story with a dark and disturbing twist. It definitely places the audience into the uneasy as well as fills us with intriuge to quite literally get under the skin of surgeon Robert Ledgard (Antonio Banderas) and the mysterious woman he keeps in isolation.  The cinematography and composition are well-crafted, adding to the surreal, dream-like state that the film’s tone presents us with. The plot serves as a Hitchcock-inspired psychological thriller. Advisable to go into the film completely blind and unknowing as complete shock and disbelief is guaranteed.

 

 

 

 

9. “Scream 4”

  • Directed by Wes Craven
  • UK Release Date: 15th April 2011

 The slasher revival that all genre fans had been waiting for and it certainly did not disappoint! Genius writer/director team Kevin Williamson and Wes Craven returned on top form to deliver a clever critique on the state of modern Hollywood horror as well as providing suspense, gore  and plenty of surprises along the way. Legendary teen-killer Ghostface (voiced by Roger Jackson)  was more vicious than ever threatening protagonist Sidney (Neve Campbell) with ” I’m gonna slit your eyelids in half so you don’t blink when I stab you in the face” resulting in a spine-chilling effect. Old faces made a welcome return with feisty reporter Gale Weathers (Courtney Cox)  and the bumbling underdog Dewey Riley (David Arquette) now the police sheriff. Accompanying them was a trendy new cast of  talented young actors consisting of fan favourite Hayden Panettiere (playing Kirby) and Emma Roberts (playing Jill) as Woodsboro’s next generation. An eagerly anticipated addition to the popular 90’s franchise.

 

8. “Fright Night”

  • Directed by Craig Gillespie
  • UK Release Date: 2nd September 2011

 A fangtastic remake that provides the audience with new blood rather than being a dated replica of the original.  “Fright Night” is the anti-“Twilight” reminding us of the days of real vampires e.g. Dracula as it focuses on bloodthirst rather than bloodlust. The original 1985 film is brought into a modern context with vampire slayer Peter Vincent (David Tennant) portrayed as a flawed, Russell Brand-esque anti-hero.  Jerry the Vampire (Colin Farrell) is both seductive and scary and proves difficult not to relish in his screen presence. More funny than frightening this update gives remakes a refresh as well as an entertaining comment on recent, tired vampire lore.

 

 

 

 

7. “Panic Button”

  • Directed by Chris Crow
  • FrightFest World Premiere: 27th August 2011

 The scariest psychological thriller of the year, “Panic Button” highlights our unhealthy obsession with social networking and the dangers we remain ignorant to. Welsh director Chris Crow creates a heat-stopping thrill ride from beginning to end as four unsuspecting internet competition winners board a plane to New York. The setting is claustrophobic with the notion of no escape and only the survival of the fittest can prevail. There are no monsters or ghouls to be thwarted, it cautions us to take a long, hard look at ourselves of everything we do and watch online leaving a thought-provoking sensation. The most intense and terrifying film of the subject-matter.

 

 

 

 

6. “The Woman” 

  • Directed by Lucky McGee
  • UK Release Date: 30th September 2011

Welcome to the dark side of Suburbia! While not an original concept “The Woman” is a stylish and unique piece of the horror genre that makes for a very uncomfortable watch. The plot focuses on an “upstanding” citizen,husband and father who secretly captures a feral woman and plans to “civilise” her through is own twisted methods and ideals, if he’s not careful he may lose a finger! With respect the film avoids relying on the classic jump-scares in order to convey the shock factor. A twisted blend of dark humour and all out gruseomness makes it a must-see for any horror fan. The twist is unforgettable and definitely worth the wait. Its controversial, its brutal, its bloody disgusting but all in a good way! Not for the faint-hearted.

 

 

 

 

5. “Insidious”

  • Directed by James Wan
  • UK Release Date 29th April 2011

The creepiest mainstream horror/supernatural film of the year! “Insidious” ramps up the scare factor with spooky imagery that remains difficult to shrug out of the mind. The build-up is intense and creative once the unexpected explanation for the haunting is revealed. A sense of empathy is in place throughout as the characters are written well and could easily depict anyone in real life. Rose Byrne particularly gives an impressive performance as the gaunt, distressed mother Renai. The tone is gritty creating a realistic feel to the setting which is also emphasised with the use of grey-scale. Chilling, atmospheric, with plenty of menacing ghouls “Insidious” is an exception to mainstream horror taking traditional ghost story elements as well as providing something new to the genre.

 

 

 

4. “Some Guy Who Kills People”

  • Directed By Jack Perez
  • Celluloid Screams UK Premiere: 22nd October 2011

“Some Guy Who Kills People” even though it displays an explicit title it ignites intrigue in the viewer. Surprisingly, despite fitting into the horror genre it is actually one of the most heart-warming films of the year which demonstrates the adaptability and versatility of horror as a whole. Protagonist Ken Boyd (played by Kevin Corrigan) is an identifiable character as the audience enters a rollercoaster ride of emotions with him, from coming to terms with harrowing past events to connecting with the daughter he never knew. A surreal, quirky, semi-gory, stylistic film very much in the vein of John Landis along with Ryan Levin’s cleverly-crafted dialogue.

 

 

3. “We Need to Talk about Kevin”

  • Directed by Lynne Ramsay
  • UK Release Date: 21st October 2011

 The film adaptation of Lionel Shriver’s novel “We Need To Talk About Kevin” while not an obvious horror contender is a startling  tale of how love can go dead wrong and the consequences that follow. Watching “Kevin” feels voyeuristic however you can’t take your eyes off the screen. The audience is placed in a position of conflict with the character of Eva (Tilda Swinton) as she fails to form a strong bond with her only son Kevin (Ezra Miller). The film has been praised highly by many critics and with good reason, Tilda Swinton delivers an unforgettable and powerful performance making the viewer both love and hate her at the same time for creating this monster capable of destroying several lives. “Kevin” is edited out of sequence which adds to the dreaded tone as we are aware of what’s to come but its the dark journey embarked on leading to the tragic event that results in an unsettling effect. The mise-en-scene uses clever symbolism to convey the narrative including tomato soup representing blood. Compelling, unnerving, chilling and exceptional; “Kevin” really questions where does blame really lie?

 

 

2. “Harold’s Going Stiff”

  • Directed by Keith Wright
  • Celluloid Screams UK Premiere 23rd October 2011

A very Sheffield-based film that conveys the great humour of the area. “Harold’s Going Stiff” has a fitting blend of black comedy and a horror as a backdrop for the narrative’s metaphor. Its one of the most unique films of the year as it depicts a sense of realism demonstrated through its strong social message of the elderly in Britain and their care-workers while also acting as an unconventional “zombie” film. The characters are written as if they were people we could relate to in real life, Stan Rowe (Harold) and Sarah Spencer (Penny) have believable on screen chemistry that really carries the film. Its a surreal portrayal of society, told in a documentary-style fashion as well as being a tale of finding friendship in the most unexpected places.  Keith Wright needs to be congratulated on creating such a well-crafted, touching horror film that has something for everyone.

 

 

 

1. “Inbred”

  • Directed by Alex Chandon
  • UK Release Date: TBA

“They came in peace and left in pieces” quite literally! “Inbred” is most definitely the most inventive horror film of the year. Four young offenders and two of their care-workers embark on a character building weekend in a remote location, the fictional Yorkshire-based village of Mortlake. Soon they come across the bizarre and twisted traditions of the locals and get caught up in a bloodbath of terror and a heart-stopping fight for survival. Think “An American Werewolf in London” meets “The Hills Have Eyes” meets “The Wicker Man” which only partly sums it up! “Inbred” incorporates many elements which is what makes it so bloody brilliant! Its a comment on modern British society, it has the essence of the Grand-Guignol, the characters are larger than life and downright entertaining, it also isn’t afraid to push the boundaries in terms of blood, guts, goats and gore, satisfying fans of the genre everywhere! Its the performances that stick out the most, the victims create a sense of empathy with the audience which is a rarity in horror, while the “Inbreds” are hilarious to watch but brutal! Prepared to be shocked and entertained at the same time. “Inbred”  has got everything a horror film should have!

 

Hayley Alice Roberts.