Archive for The Witches

Hayley’s Top 5 Disturbing Moments in Horror!

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 6, 2015 by Hayley's Horror Reviews

Being a seasoned horror fan you think you’ve seen it all, therefore when you discover a film that unexpectedly gets under the skin, infiltrating the mind and completely disturbing you then you’ve found something truly effective. Being scared by a horror movie is completely subjective and mine may be a little more obscure than most. Here is my top 5 personal list of moments in movies (and one television show) that have utterly freaked me out since childhood and beyond.

WARNING: There will be spoilers.

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5. Trust (2010): Rape Scene plus End Credits.

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Positioned at number 5 due to being the most recent and inspiration for this list, Trust is directed by David Schwimmer, best known as Ross Gellar in hit sitcom Friends. Trust is a cautionary tale about the dangers of online relationships. The premise centres around naive fourteen year old girl, Annie (Liana Liberato) who develops an online relationship with a boy named ‘Charlie’. ‘Charlie’ turns out to be a man in his 30’s and lures Annie back to a seedy motel room where he goes on to rape and molest her. Its harrowing viewing as Annie pleads with him to stop and we hear everything while the camera fixates on the ugly, garish wall paper creating a somewhat nauseating feeling, we see that ‘Charlie’ has placed a camera discreetly in order to capture the ordeal. While not even a horror film and more of a crime drama, Trust is an eye-opening film experience that all should see, parents and children alike. It goes to a dark place with how much it portrays and the devastating effects on both Annie and her family. Without revealing too much the end credits provide some heartbreaking revelations with an unnerving final shot. The film led me to read about a found-footage horror with similar thematics titled Megan is Missing (2011). From what I’ve been told about the film its not very well made and there’s some brutal images associated with it related to fetish torture, however the final 22 minutes are gut punching and highly disturbing taking the online predator concept to all kinds of depraved levels. For at least the time being, Megan is Missing is a film I’ll avoid. Forget the boogeyman, this is realistic horror.

4. Pet Sematary (1989): Zelda.

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Forget Freddy and Jason, this creepy character from the film adaptation of Stephen King’s novel is one of the scariest elements of 80s horror. Within a flashback segment, we are told a traumatic childhood tale from Rachel Creed (Denise Crosby) of how her gravely ill sister Zelda was locked away until her final days. Zelda is skeletal and inhuman in appearance, the scene is both sad and frightening, especially viewing it at a young age as many of us did, my recollection being late night on Channel 5 watching it alone in the dark. We see a young Rachel reluctantly feed Zelda in disgust and choking noises are heard. She is played by a male actor Andrew Hubatsek who does an exceptional job at freaking the audience out with his portrayal. Hearing her call Rachel’s name sends chills down the spine. Rachel speaks of her hopes of Zelda’s death and her fears that she’ll be held responsible, an absolutely disturbing notion for a child to contend with. A later scene shows Zelda menacingly address the camera screaming at Rachel that she’ll “Never get out of bed again”. If you grew up in the 80s or 90s no doubt the idea of Zelda being at the end of your bed was a terrifying thought.

3. Frighteners (1997): If You Meet a Fairy…

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This one was discussed on the Ghostface Girls podcast episode of Childhood Horror and is pretty much an obscure choice. Not many will remember the seemingly forgotten CITV Horror anthology series, Frighteners. Apparently airing between 1996 and 1997 Frighteners showed four episodes in total, the final one being “If You Meet a Fairy…” I recall viewing it one afternoon after school, if memory serves me correct the episode was about a young girl in the Victorian era who discovers fairies at the bottom of the garden. At first the creatures are nice but soon turn sinister as they torment the girl and her family. Its explained on this old 2006 forum, Vault of Evil:

“During the 90’s i remeber seeing a episode from some horror anthology series which creeped the hell out of me as a kid. Ive looked high and low but i cant remeber what it was called and its driving me mad.

The one episode i can remeber goes like this. I think it was set during early 1900’s and was about a little girl finding a little fairy at the bottom of her garden. She takes it in and keeps it in her dolls house but then things take a sinister turn. Her little sister begins acting strangly and the fairy (which looks more and more evil) It begins folowing her to dinner and stabbing her ankle untill she tosses it some meat to eat. More and more of the evil creatures begin showing up and she resorts to locking them away in her celler and asking her cousins for help. When she shows them the captive fairies in the gloom they mistake them for small animals and let them out. Horrific screams echo through the house as we see the mother, youngest daughter and maid in the nursary. The maid hurries down the hall but sees something terrible offscreen and begins screaming at the unseen horde of giggling/screeching monsters. The mother hears the maids cries and looks at her child which suddenly has the distorted giggling face of one of the fairy/trolls. It then faded to black as the sound of her screams were slowly drowned out by the giggling voices of the fairies. This is the only episode i remeber and i have a nagging feeling that it was part of a kids TV show on CITV or CBBC. I doubt it however as the children were actually eaten alive by the troll/fairies but i cant help shake the feeling.”

It was definitely the fairies giggling and distorted face that I recall which bothered my seven year old former self. There’s barely any information about the anthology or this particular episode online, no youtube footage and no google images. Its as if its faded into obscurity like some sort of creepypasta Candle Cove style!

2. Resurrecting the Street Walker (2009): Snuff Murders.

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British horror Resurrecting the Street Walker was part of the Abertoir Festival line up back in 2009, the first full year I attended. It was a film I went into completely blind and one of my first experiences of a hard-hitting indie film through the festival circuit. Resurrecting the Street Walker is about an ambitious, low budget filmmaker that comes across an incomplete black and white underground film from the 1980’s. He gradually becomes fascinated with the idea of finishing the film which leads him into the mysterious and sickening world of snuff. The film is presented in a mockumentary style documenting the filmmaker’s downfall toward the dark side as he grows more and more obsessed with the ambiguous Street Walker, evoking the video nasties panic and fear over the existence of snuff films. The performance from James Powell as James Parker and direction were powerful and convincing enough to create an unnerving reaction as he is driven insane by the enigma of the snuff film that he goes to complete it by murdering innocent people, including a pregnant colleague, taking things to a whole other shocking level. Having the film shot in black and white contributed to Street Walker’s grim and gritty tone as it breaks the fourth wall creating something that cuts closely to the bone. The movie undoubtedly upset me with snuff being a disturbing topic and left me speechless as I left the cinema. Resurrecting the Street Walker is available on DVD with some positive reviews over on amazon however its not a film I’ve discussed much since amongst the horror community and seems to have faded into the background despite being utterly effective and quite a nasty, mean-spirited movie.

1. The Witches (1990): Stuck in the painting.

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Without a doubt The Witches is a strong contender for most frightening children’s film of all time. Its consistent sinister tone throughout is uncomfortable viewing incorporated with its nightmarish visuals. Its even uneasy re-watching as an adult. Years ago I would have said the moment where the Grand High Witch (the superb Anjelica Huston) reveals her true self by peeling off her own face to be the scariest or possibly the scene at the beginning where Luke (Jansen Fisher) is goaded to come down from his tree house by an evil witch with glowing purple eyes. Intense stuff! However the most nightmare-fuelled moment in Nicholas Roeg’s Children’s chiller is where a young girl is captured down an alley way by a witch in a traumatic flashback told by the Grandmother (Mai Zetterling). The next time the girl is seen she is trapped in a painting forever with no escape until eventually she fades away. Adapted from Roald Dahl’s novel of the same name, the moment is creative and frightening setting up a dark, twisted and threatening world for children’s imaginations. Its bold and daring in what it does. If you grew up in the 90s this film was responsible for numerous nightmares and was the first film that ever truly scared me. The strangest part was as I got older and began watching A Nightmare on Elm Street, Hellraiser etc. nothing came as close to the fright factor as The Witches, its an exceptionally chilling piece of children’s horror cinema.

Do you agree with the list? Comments & Feedback is appreciated, also tell me what have been your most disturbing on-screen moments in film and television.

Hayley Alice Roberts

Hayley’s Horror Reviews.

**Third Anniversary Review** Embracing the Dark Side: Why We Watch Horror? A Personal Piece.

Posted in Anniversary Pieces, Horror Festivals with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 18, 2014 by Hayley's Horror Reviews

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To many of us Horror films are an integral part of who we are. They’re something that has shaped our interests and is a genre that continues to both fascinate and terrify us. There are several types of viewers when it comes to Horror; there’s the casual viewer who will take an interest and perhaps watch out of endurance with the possibility of generating a sense of fear. There’s those who completely dismiss horror due to squeamishness or not realizing  the underlying metaphors beyond the imagery presented before them; and finally there’s the the Horror fan, a category myself and many awesome people I’ve come to know over the passed few years fall into. The Horror fan is passionate about what’s going on in the genre, we adore the classic films that have shaped our knowledge from the Universal Monsters to the Hammer’s Horrors. We have an appreciation for the trends, conventions and tropes and make time to consume the latest in independent film through attending genre festivals. We also may be avid viewers of Sky’s Horror Channel and purchase niche magazines e.g. Scream Horror Magazine and Fangoria. But why is it we have a particular attraction to the dark side? to the macabre? to all things gory? Why is it we watch Horror?

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Don’t fear the Horror Fan!

Many psychologists have concluded that fear itself taps into our primitive subconscious. This insightful article explains Sigmund Freud’s theory regarding our fascination with horror, his interpretation suggested that strange, unexplained images found in the id are suppressed by the ‘civilized’ ego whereas another famous psychologist Carl Jung expressed the idea that there are a form of archetypes deep within our subconscious that are linked with images continually present within the horror genre. Interestingly this sort of indicates the possibility that this is an integral part of everyone however the horror fan seems to embrace their primitive subconscious more than those who object to violent imagery. Over the years I have endured criticism for my taste for the bloodier side of film. “How can you watch something like that? It’s Sick!” is a common assumption and in fairness, how anyone interprets any of imagery is subjective. To suggest that each and every one of us have violent tendencies somewhere in our make up is pretty scary to comprehend however as horror fans, the fact that we subject ourselves to these images on a frequent basis can act as a form of catharsis and as an outlet for our deep-rooted aggression. I am a firm believer that the link between watching horror films and violence in society is incredibly weak and is more than often caused by untreated psychological issues. That said, if that’s all we watched horror films for it would be a pretty tedious exercise and without a doubt Horror holds a great deal of entertainment value.

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One of the most relateable pieces of literature I have come across is Mark Kermode’s ‘I was a Teenage Horror Fan’ which is featured in Martin Barker and Julian Petley’s book Ill Effects: The Media Violence Debate. Kermode discusses how the horror fan deciphers a deeper meaning of the images we see on screen.  Despite coming from a different generation, similarly to Kermode I became fascinated with horror at a young age, as a pre-teen to be exact. My favorite television shows at Primary School age were Buffy The Vampire Slayer (1997-2003)Are You Afraid Of The Dark? (1991-2000) and Goosebumps (1995-1998). I had already been terrified by Nicholas Roeg’s dark children’s film The Witches (1990) and would always re-watch Return to Oz (1985) when it was broadcast on TV. Even when I watched Disney films, the villains seemed more interesting than the heroes/heroines. While originally frightened by the obscure and uncanny, the older I got the more obsessed I became. I would always gravitate toward Horror VHS’s at the local rental shop, curious of the sinister looking monsters that appeared on the artistic covers, Pinhead and Freddy Kruger being stand outs.

Without prior knowledge of Freddy Kruger, this video case in particular appeared unnerving to my younger self.

As Kermode discusses his curiosity with The Exorcist (1973) on its initial UK release in 1974 due to hysteria and word of mouth from those who had seen it, the media hype surrounding these films only encourage that curiosity to grow bringing determination to see the horror on screen unfold for ourselves. For me the films that have caused controversy during my own generation include The Bunny Game (2010), A Serbian Film (2010) and The Human Centipede Films (2009, 2011), I have only seen the latter films mentioned but genuinely feel there has been unfair misconceptions surrounding them, its definitely clear that since the moral panics of the 80’s, not a great deal has changed in certain cases however horror has generally become a slightly more accepted form of entertainment. During my childhood, horror films were always  playground discussions in terms of who had seen what and how terrifying the film was but to my knowledge I was one of the only ones who let that sense of fear and enigma become a life-long interest.

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Kermode mentions that there’s a certain solitude that originally comes with being a genre fan. He recollects his late night visits to grindhouse London cinemas to enjoy X-rated double bills in which he’d be surrounded by like-minded people who in his words would be ‘getting more out of the movies than passing scares, watching them again and again, learning them, studying them’. Whereas I was never fortunate to experience horror in the cinema until at least the age of 15, prior to that I would record endless VHS tapes of the Elm Streets, the Friday 13ths, Scream’s etc. and of course watch them alone with pure enthrallment. I was determined to watch anything that was listed in the TV guide with the tag ‘Horror’ even if I was unfamiliar with its content and would end up watching a terribly bad film. Despite this, being a horror fan meant it was difficult to find other people to relate to back then. It also wasn’t until I studied a Horror module at university I was able to develop different ways of thinking about the films I’d grown up with and always loved.

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Community is a vital part of being a horror fan. It was 2009 when I attended my first full horror festival at Abertoir, which has been an annual tradition ever since. In 2011 I also began to visit Sheffield for Celluloid Screams. Attending these goreific events has allowed me to meet and socialize with others who share my interest. Not only do we watch a selection of brilliant movies but there’s the opportunities to discuss them afterwards and even meet the filmmakers behind them. One of the most appealing aspects of horror fandom is this close-knit community. Filmmakers in general are approachable and happy to give time to their fans and the fans themselves are some of the friendliest people I’ve ever come across.

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Therefore, there are several reasons why horror films are so appealing and why being a fan of them is incredibly important. There’s the enjoyment of the suspense and tense atmosphere, the familiarity of the tropes and conventions displayed, the opportunity to study the genre and discover interesting metaphors that say something profound about our society. There’s the sense of catharsis violent imagery can provide us with as well as the ability to identify with the characters we see on screen in some way or another. We also can’t forget the adrenaline rush a thrill ride of terror can give us, there’s the iconic imagery we come to recognize as well as the wide spectrum of sub-genres on offer from slashers in masks to the spooky supernatural. We keep watching because there’s so much more to discover as horror continues to transform and adapt. While there are times when Horror films may seem tired and repeated there’s always still plenty of underground gems that really blow our minds, Horror still has the ability to shock and scare us and we indulge.

I’d like to say a massive thank you to the amazing horror community that have supported me over these passed three years, it really means a lot and has provided me with some fangtastic writing opportunities that I hope will continue.

Thanks for Reading.

Hayley Alice Roberts

Hayley’s Horror Reviews.

**For last year’s Second Anniversary Review on Urban Legends in Film Visit:**

https://mshayleyr1989.wordpress.com/2013/05/17/second-anniversary-review-part-one-urban-legends-in-films-television/

https://mshayleyr1989.wordpress.com/2013/05/18/second-anniversary-review-part-two-movie-mayhem-the-shocks-behind-the-scenes/

Women In Horror Month: Final Girls and Psychotic Women. (9-7)

Posted in Women in Horror Recognition Month with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 9, 2014 by Hayley's Horror Reviews

Once again I bring you three more women of horror. From the spine-chilling and the sadistic to the tragic heroine.The Horror genre is versatile in terms  of the different types of characters it portrays, I hope that the choices about to be discussed will illustrate the eclectic mix that’s on offer.  Here is part three of my Women in Horror Recognition Month coverage. I am really enjoying working on this mini-project and would like to thank everyone for their support and feedback especially the shares and re-tweets on Twitter. You’re all awesome. **Gory Hugs**

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Oh and here’s the obligatory SPOILER WARNING. Therefore if you haven’t seen the films I’m about to discuss go check them out then return…!

9. Angela Baker, The Sleepaway Camp Series (1983-2008)

  • Played By Felissa Rose and Pamela Springstein
  • Written and Directed By Robert Hiltzik
  • Sequels Directed By Michael A. Simpson & Written By Fritz Gordon

angela  Now this addition to the countdown may be a little complicated for two key reasons. The first is that Angela (Felissa Rose) technically isn’t female. For those of you who are fans of the bizarrely warped 80’s slasher Sleepaway Camp, you’ll be aware that the most iconic aspect of the entire film was it’s shock-tastic ending that not only reveals the sweet, misunderstood Angela as the killer but she is also genetically a boy! The welcome yet fascinating surprise deviates Sleepaway Camp from *just* being the run-of-the-mill slasher like many that emerged that decade even receiving it’s own spoof in the stop-motion animation comedy series Robot Chicken (2005-) where it’s exclaimed “somebody remembered this movie and wrote a comedy sketch about it”. Well myself and Seth Green certainly did! The second problematic element faced when discussing Angela is the subsequent sequels.

Now some fans like to disassociate Sleepaway Camp II: Unhappy Campers (1988) and Sleepaway Camp III: Teenage Wasteland (1989) from the original but for me they are too entertaining and enjoyable to disregard. Felissa Rose was concentrating on her university studies at the time of filming therefore had to decline reprising the role (she does however make a comeback in Return to Sleepaway Camp (2008)). Pamela Springstein stepped in as a more confident, post-sex change Angela, the only similarity being she still has a lust for the blade and now as a camp counselor she rids “Camp Rolling Hills” of the morally corrupt teenagers it inhabits! Now it’s fair that Angela qualifies for this list as she has lived as a female her entire life and eventually underwent reassignment surgery to do so; so it counts!

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The opening of the original Sleepaway Camp introduces young children Angela and Peter on a boating lake with their father. Following a tragic accident that sees their boat flip over, the family attempt to swim to shore but are subsequently wiped out by an incoming motorboat. Due to some clever editing techniques it is presumed that Peter and his Father are now dead! Fast forward a few years later and cousins Ricky (Jonathan Tiersten) and Angela are heading to Camp Arawak for the summer where her murderous rampage begins! Towards the climax the film reveals that Angela’s Aunt was behind transforming young Peter into his deceased sister Angela, creating the “daughter” she always wanted. It’s then heavily implied that Angela’s deviant and anti-social behavior is a product of discovering her father’s homosexual tendencies. Freud would certainly have a field day! However its not difficult to feel empathy for Angela due to her confusing upbringing, leading to a gender/identity crisis as well as the constant bullying she receives from the more well-developed girls at camp that illustrate her insecurities. There’s plenty of symbolism in place that hints at Angela’s true identity in her kills, alpha bitch Judy (Karen Fields) is raped with a hot straightening iron for example. With a cold, icy stare, Felissa Rose plays the vulnerable Angela fantastically bringing in her own youth and innocence to the role. Springstein’s interpretation however is far more campy and menacing but still an incredibly fun performance to watch and she does use some creative methods to murder those who don’t live up to her “moral ideals” namely sexual activity and cursing. The character of Angela is definitely an interesting study of the psychotic female. Sleepaway Camp sets itself apart from other slashers of its time through its use of plenty of underlying subtext relating to gender, creative and well thought through kills and the fact it’s a seemingly innocent thirteen year old girl committing the gruesome murders. Compared to most, Sleepaway Camp demonstrated more authenticity by featuring teenagers portraying their actual ages. On the surface there is a lot of sleaziness but Sleepaway Camp is far more sophisticated than it’s given credit for. Felissa Rose’s performance marks the original film as ahead of it’s time by exploring avenues that the majority of slashers of the time never dared to.

8. The Grand High Witch, The Witches (1990)

  • Played By Anjelica Huston
  • Directed By Nicholas Roeg
  • Written By Roald Dahl (Novel), Allan Scott (Screenplay)

witches-thewitches2-590x350  Now for some kiddie-horror. Like many children growing up in the 90’s, this woman haunted my nightmares! Since watching more Nicholas Roeg films over the years, most recently The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976); I finally have an understanding of the warped, nightmarish vision that’s prominent in his work and he certainly doesn’t tone it down for a film aimed at a family audience. Roeg takes an unsettling approach to the material and uses intense close ups especially in the more frightening moments.

There is nothing redeeming about The Grand High Witch who originally emerged from literature, in Roald Dahl’s twisted, fantasy novel. However it’s sensational actress Anjelica Huston that brings this wicked witch to life in a spine-chilling and unforgettable performance. Her character enters the film later on following a careful set-up that establishes what the witches of this universe are capable of. Once she’s made her entrance her presence is really felt as Anjelica Huston delivers one of children’s cinema’s most scariest performances. I’m pretty sure when this film has been broadcast on television it comes with a content warning. Merging between beautiful and grotesque, The Grand High Witch sets out to achieve one objective, to rid the world of children by introducing a special formula she has personally brewed. She organizes a convention at a picturesque English hotel bringing together a large number of witches to do her bidding of transforming the children into mice then squishing them! The face she displays to the world is actually a disguise, underneath the mask is a monstrous creature that’s incredibly unnerving created with special effects courtesy of Jim Henson’s creative make up department. When willing to reveal her true identity, the Grand High Witch literally peels her face off! Nasty Stuff. She wears a wig in order to hide her bald, bloody scalp, gloves to shield her long, sharp fingernails and flat shoes to disguise her toe-less feet. Fear not though as this evil woman does not succeed in her plans and is thwarted by a young boy named Luke (Jansen Fisher) and his knowledgeable Grandmother (Mai Zetterling). The meddling duo literally give her a taste of her own medicine through slipping the formula into the hotel soup. Before her demise, the Grand High Witch once more transforms into a freakishly over-sized rat that is almost as nightmare-fuel worthy as what’s under her mask! The Grand High Witch is one woman of horror I’ve never, ever forgotten and the film as a whole may be partially responsible for my curiosity of the genre from a young age. Whether in awe of or feared, The Grand High Witch is one sinister creature.

7. Helen Shivers, I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997)

  • Played By Sarah Michelle Gellar
  • Directed By Jim Gillespie
  • Written By Lois Duncan (Novel), Kevin Williamson (Screenplay)

helenshivers  Neither a psychotic woman or a final girl, this character is a rarity in the genre, the best friend archetype being preferred over the heroine herself. In this case it’s down to the strong writing and acting that brings the character to life. Helen Shivers (Sarah Michelle Gellar) is a young woman with her whole future ahead of her. Wavering on the superficial side, Helen dreams of escaping the small town life and venture to New York to become a famous actress. Helen is aware of her looks and uses them to get where she wants to be and is particularly proud of her long, blonde locks. When we are introduced to her she is the winner of the local beauty pageant, the girlfriend of the high school football star Barry Cox (Ryan Phillipe) and best friend of the protagonist Julie James (Jennifer Love Hewitt). However Helen’s life changes forever on that fateful 4th of July night where the four friends including Julie’s boyfriend Ray (Freddie Prinze Jr.) accidentally run over a mysterious bystander lurking in the middle of the road. Fearing him dead, the foursome decide to dispose of his body in the ocean. On doing so, the fisherman momentarily comes back to life stealing Helen’s pageant crown which Barry then retrieves for her down the murky depths of the sea.

A year later and Helen is a shadow of her former self. The pretty, blonde, hopeful actress is now gone and in place is a tormented, lonely girl who’s constantly watching her back. Seemingly just going through every day life, the realization of her part in the hit and run crime is restored when Julie brings the gang back together after receiving a threatening note claiming “I know what you did last summer”. On the surface Helen comes across as the typical, blonde female that is more than often butchered by a hooded killer in films of this nature and in theory she is. However due to some smart writing on the part of Kevin Williamson and a fiery performance from Sarah Michelle Gellar, Helen is more than meets the eye creating a sense of empathy with her. She has always been a far more interesting character to watch over Julie as the audience realize she is more than just a weak victim offered up to the killer. The killer fisherman raises the stakes with Helen over Julie as he cuts off her most prized possession while asleep, her long, golden hair, signifying the depth and change in her character. Gellar’s on-screen chemistry with Phillipe is electrifying, making Helen and Barry a believable couple that genuinely care about each other.

After witnessing Barry’s murder in a room full of people from the stage of the Croaker Queen pageant, Helen is an emotional wreck, stripping away any facade she may have previously had. She struggles to be believed by the police and even up until her final moments, she isn’t afraid to fight back and prove her resourcefulness just like any true final girl would. She runs and takes refuge in her snarky, older sister Elsa’s (Bridgette Wilson) store, hiding from the killer then jumping out of a window and running to safety. Sadly, she is too late, as she gets closer to the 4th of July parade and the comfort of crowds of people, the fisherman catches up with her, slicing her up with a hook. Helen is a tragic victim and her presence is even felt in the not-so-memorable sequel, I Still Know What You Did Last Summer (1998) where Julie reminisces about her deceased friend by picking up a photograph of her taken from the pageant as Hooverphonic’s Eden plays non-diegetically. What’s interesting about the character is that she is a product of the post-Scream slasher where it was self-awareness over stereotype. Williamson offered a female, horror movie character who the audience could care about despite killing her off in order to raise the stakes and create suspense. Helen’s death is still considered to be one of the most remembered of this era, despite the film not gaining the popularity that was intended for it.  Well rounded and dynamic, despite not surviving, Helen still deserves a place as a woman of horror.

Hayley Alice Roberts

Hayley’s Horror Reviews